Newbie

The place for general discussions and requests for help on all matters relating to T gauge.
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dkightley
Posts: 1268
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Newbie

Post by dkightley »

Sounds like the charger unit you tried may not have been compatible after all. Was it 5 DC, as I said it needed to be? The polarity may possibly have been wrong. Did you check it with a meter before you plugged it in?? :?

If it now is damaged and can only work on batteries, that should still be okay. Batteries will last a heck of a long time. I've used NiCad rechargeables for the best part of eight hours continuously powering two or more power cars at the same time without any problems. Duracells should last much longer before they need replacing.
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk

chadnn
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2017 4:45 am

Re: Newbie

Post by chadnn »

It was a 5VDC, 2.1A charger. After it cooled down I tried a 5VDC, 1A charger and it seemed to be OK. So it seems that I had to many amps. Live and learn,just happy that I can still use it :)

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dkightley
Posts: 1268
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Newbie

Post by dkightley »

So it seems that I had to many amps.
It doesn't work like that. The amp values are the maximum current the power supply is designed to supply.....its capacity. The voltage is the killer in the equation. If the voltage was say 12v instead of 5v, then there is a risk that components will overheat spectacularly because 12v would generate a much higher current through the component than what 5v would. And if the power supply was AC instead of DC, then the danger is the reverse polarity half of the time. That would damage components as well!
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk

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