Newbies cry for help!

The place for general discussions and requests for help on all matters relating to T gauge.
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peterg
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:25 am
Location: Nr Rugby, Warwickshire

Newbies cry for help!

Post by peterg »

Hi to all
As you can see i am new to the forum and i am actually very new to railway modelling in any form or scale.
Being retired i find that i need to stimulate the old grey matter and keep the mind occupied.....so why T-Gauge ?
For many years (since i first heard about N-Gauge i vowed that one day i would build a mini railway in a coffee table or suitcase). Having recently investigated further i stumbled on reference to T. This has grabbed my imagination to the point that i now wish to "get going" but have no real idea where to start.
I know i want T Gauge because of the small layouts possible.
I would like to build something in the size range 900 x 450 approx'.
Ideally i would like to do something based on American rocky mountain railways (or similar) but from what i can see getting loco's/ rolling stock would be a problem ??
If that rolling stock is not available then something like the Settle to Carlisle with viaduct sounds good.
I have never laid an inch of track of any kind but i am very practical...good with my hands....not easily daunted.
Now for the questions and there are a few so thanks for your patience;

As a rookie should i start with rigid track or Flexitrack ??
What are the pros & cons for each and which looks the more realistic when laid ??
Should i build on plywood with foam for elevation differences or initially just go for a level bed ??
Money will be fairly tight so am i best sticking to a fairly simple "there & back" layout.
It seems that T gauge does not have a massive following as yet so is this actually thye way to go or should i be looking at making room for N-Gauge?
I have only found 2 UK dealers for T gauge....one in Edinburgh and 1 in Sussex..........are there any more ?????????
Are there any members living in the Rugby area ?
Thanks for listening and i look forward to your comments

Pete

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dkightley
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Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by dkightley »

Hi Pete

Welcome to the mad world of T. :)

To answer your questions in order....

Sections or rigid....I've only used sections but from what I've seen/heard sections simply lay the path they are made for and flexi tends to have a life of its own and needs fixing down firmly. Having said that, flexi's lack of shiny brass connectors gives a more realistic appearance without having to do hard work disguising the track pieces. And remember that points are track sections...and interfacing from flexi to sections is hard to disguise.

Track bed....you'll probably need ply for flexi...but I've used artist's board (foam core with card outer) very sucessfully...see the Robins Run layout thread).

T or N.....well, I'm biased...T! ;)

And there's not many dealers....at the moment. As soon as we create a big stir...then more shops, etc will look to stock T. TGauge.com is the sole importer of Eishindo products at the moment..and has driven the introduction of the HST and ICE sets!!

Back to your general comments. I had never laid a single section of model railway track before I started Robins Run....so not knowing where to start is not a handicap!

I'm in Nottingham....and I'm not sure if there's anyone else in your area. If you're at a loose end on Sat 15th Feb, you could take a run out to Milton Keynes....I'll have Robins Run at the railway show held by the local club!
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk

peterg
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:25 am
Location: Nr Rugby, Warwickshire

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by peterg »

Thanks for the quick reply Doug.
From what you said i am leaning towards Flexi but can you clarify which you prefer as i may have misinterpreted your opening comments.
If i go for Flexi then i will make sure that i have a closed circuit with no switches.
Now then, lets see if i can find that Robins Run thread.

If you can let me have details of time and place i will try and make it to M.Keynes.

ATB
Pete

mattd10
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Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 10:12 pm
Location: West Sussex, UK
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Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by mattd10 »

Hi Pete! Welcome!!

I've not got a lot to add onto Doug's comments, but I'm using T flex track and found it pretty alright to lay (went for a bit of a bodge and superglued it directly to ply, but it works well!) Only problem is you then have the hassle of ballasting it yourself! Personally, I think it does look realistic and is definitely worth the extra effort, but as a complete newbie the simplicity of the rigid may be more appealing? (i'm still very much a newbie though!)

With regards to T or N, I've worked in N and did like it, but not being able to do realistic curves was my main issue! You can get realistic scale curves in a fairly tight space in T, something you need masses of space for in N. There is the advantage in N of more rolling stock (especially if US stuff takes your fancy) but don't let that prospect alone put you off T!

Hope this helps!

Matt

peterg
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:25 am
Location: Nr Rugby, Warwickshire

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by peterg »

Hello Matt thanks for the words of encouragement on flexitrack, it's what newbies want to hear.

Have just had a look at Dougs Robins Run thread.....WOW what a great job but a bit ambitious for me as a starter.

Cheers
Pete

DiTape
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 10:31 pm

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by DiTape »

I have used rigid sectional track on little fiddleton and have had no problems.

If you are looking at small size models with a USA layout in mind have you thought about Z-gauge it is in between N and T and there is plenty of American stock available ready to run.
N=9mm track gauge,Z=6mm track gauge,T=3mm track gauge.

Di
p.s. I have modeled in O, OO ,N,Z and T and currently own layouts in OO and T.
Last edited by DiTape on Tue Feb 04, 2014 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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dkightley
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Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by dkightley »

If you can let me have details of time and place i will try and make it to M.Keynes.
http://www.mkmrs.org.uk/exhibitions/
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk

peterg
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:25 am
Location: Nr Rugby, Warwickshire

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by peterg »

DiTape wrote:I have used rigid sectional track on little fiddleton and have had no problems.

If you are looking at small size models with a USA layout in mind have you thought about Z-gauge it is in between N and T and there is plenty of American stock available ready to run.
N=9mm track gauge,Z=6mm track gauge,T=3mm track gauge.

Di
p.s. I have modeled in O, OO ,N,Z and T and currently own layouts in OO and T.
Thanks Di
More food for thought now if i consider Z gauge.
Will almost certainly go for T gauge...watch this space.
Pete

jesse6669
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:31 pm

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by jesse6669 »

peterg wrote: Ideally i would like to do something based on American rocky mountain railways (or similar) but from what i can see getting loco's/ rolling stock would be a problem ??

Pete
Hmm.. something like this? http://www.railpictures.net/images/d1/0 ... 950665.jpg
Or further north like this: http://media.trainspo.com/uploads/photo ... 363417.jpg

I sell shells on Shapeways that will give you a good EMD FP9 model from the 35mm mechanisms. And 85' passenger car shells as well. So techncially, either is possible, but I will say it would require a bit of experience and skill to complete successfully. But it is a GREAT idea in my opinion! Feel free to PM me about the FP9 and NAm. prototype rolling stock available.

A couple of tips--
--I first and foremost recommend some kind of magnifying eye-wear. T-gauge is VERY small. Opti-visor or jewelers magnifier.
--Read the forums, but get a starter kit and play with it to get familiar.
--For track plans, switching is not really feasible, and simple is better; The turnouts/points in T are not yet very reliable. So a big loop is really a nice idea. perhaps a folded dogbone with "double track" main line in the middle. Or utilize the auto reverse mechanism. I'm hoping to do that next, after I finish my little loop.

There's quite a lot of information out on the web now-a-days on Shapeways too.

Welcome aboard!
Jesse

peterg
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:25 am
Location: Nr Rugby, Warwickshire

Re: Newbies cry for help!

Post by peterg »

Hey Jesse you read my mind, those pic's show exactly what i had in mind.
I got the idea from an IMAX film i saw in the US last month....it showed in great detail the route and landscapes encountered in establishing a railroad across the rockies from the Pacific to the Michigan area i think it was...fantastic.
Coming down to earth, i hear what you say about needing more experience and will have to leave it for a later time.
Interesting to hear about your shells though and maybe sometime we will meet up and can discuss further.

ATB
Pete

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