•   
  • Talking T Gauge Shop
    Your online shop for T gauge locomotives, rolling stock and scenery items. Buy for your layout...and support the forum at the same time!

Board index Talking T Gauge Forum T Gauge Modelling Tips, Tricks & Tutorials

The three Ts. Lift the lid on the secrets of how you do things so others can have a go.....

Making Trees

Postby dkightley » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:22 pm

I thought I'd recreate the tutorial from the old site on making trees in T gauge.

The raw materials:
Img_0750_red.jpg
Img_0750_red.jpg (28.96 KiB) Viewed 3174 times

Starting bottom left...

Rubberised horsehair sheet - used in the restoration of old furniture. Find a self-employed restorer and ask him/her nicely for some offcuts of matting. If you're lucky you'll get some for free...and possibly an interesting conversation if you take along a T gauge loco! ;) Alternatively, pay a fortune for a 6in square from a model railway shop!

A selection of scenery flock in suitable colours.

Diluted white glue - the usual formula with a drop of washing up liquid to break suface tension. You'll need some neat glue as well!

(optional...but useful) A syringe - to apply the glue. Mine was from a printer ink refill kit (its too big for using on myself...just in case you might be thinking!! :roll: )

Cocktail sticks or toothpicks, etc.

Not in the picture.....brown paint for painting the trunks the appropriate colour.
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
User avatar
dkightley
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Making Trees

Postby dkightley » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:34 pm

The whole thing is likely to be somewhat messy, as you'll get all sorts of bits everywhere, so I don't recommend doing this in the lounge...or even in front of your PC!

Step 1

Paint one end of a number of the cocktail sticks...about 1 1/2in (4cm) to give a long enough trunk. Set aside to dry.

Step2

The horsehair matting will be about 2 inches thick. Using a large pair of scissors, cut a strip about half an inch wide, then cut into half inch pieces, so you end up with a collection of 1/2 inch square x 2 inch springy blocks. You can vary the size if you want to make larger/smaller sized trees. If making small trees, you might get two out of the 2 inch thickness. Here's a sample selection:
Img_0753_red.jpg
Img_0753_red.jpg (46.85 KiB) Viewed 3172 times
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
User avatar
dkightley
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Making Trees

Postby dkightley » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:40 pm

Step 3

Once the trunks are dry, put a dab of neat white glue on the pointed end of the trunk and spear into the matting to form a square-looking tree. You may need to insert another drop of glue into the top to make sure the matting will adhere properly. Here's a shot of freshly speared trees:
Img_0754_red.jpg
Img_0754_red.jpg (34.96 KiB) Viewed 3171 times


Leave to dry thoroughly...preferably overnight.
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
User avatar
dkightley
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Making Trees

Postby dkightley » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:51 pm

Step 4

The first of the artistic bits. 8-)

Using scissors, give each tree a haircut to form the desired shape you want for each tree. The finished article will be very slightly bigger...so try and shape each one so it looks .......well, tree-like! Or like a nude tree;theres no leaves yet!


Step 5

The second artistic bit...and I should have mentioned earlier that you wouldn't be needing the dilute white glue until now. :oops:

Dip a tree into the dilute glue, shake off the excess, and dip into whatever colour scenery flock you want. Squeeze and tease the flock into the matting until the tree is formed how you want it.

Finish off by dribbling glue all over the flock to make sure it will stay in place when the glue dries.

Stick the tree into some foam, etc to dry, making sure that and glue that runs out doesn't do any harm!

And here's a few finished trees. Don't touch! They're still wet!
Img_0755_red.jpg
Img_0755_red.jpg (30.67 KiB) Viewed 3171 times
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
User avatar
dkightley
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Making Trees

Postby dkightley » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:54 pm

And here's a few more from another batch I did the same evening:
Img_0756_red.jpg
Img_0756_red.jpg (27.84 KiB) Viewed 3170 times
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
User avatar
dkightley
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm
Location: Nottingham, UK

Re: Making Trees

Postby grahame » Sun Apr 20, 2014 12:52 pm

Thank you for this. I was just thinking today that I need some trees..and I don't want to pay silly prices for them :)
British exPat in Houston, Texas.
User avatar
grahame
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:07 am
Location: Houston, Texas

Re: Making Trees

Postby gbtrains » Thu Aug 18, 2016 6:28 pm

Hi Doug
thanks for the tips there and all the pics.

Will be a great help in making them...mmmmmmm just need time to build them?.


Will keep you posted.

Graham
:D
gbtrains
 
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 6:21 pm

Re: Making Trees

Postby gbtrains » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:31 am

Hi all
Just to let you all know that you can buy some small trees from ebay from a Shop called Devons Secrets


This is what it says in the title
10/25 x architecture scenery model railway people HO OO gauge new trees 38mm T2

At £3.95 for 10 trees free postage.
Or £7.25 for 25 trees free postage.
:D
Attachments
Trees Cheap.jpg
trees to be had if you do not have time to make your own.
Trees Cheap.jpg (32.15 KiB) Viewed 574 times
gbtrains
 
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 6:21 pm

Re: Making Trees

Postby zdrada69 » Sun May 28, 2017 6:06 pm

Most of my trees are bigger (1:220) but I was inspired by fellow modeller from Poland making his models (not working) in 1:700 (cars, railway models, buildings).
You can find some of his job here: http://evadam.pl/en/ I belive his models can be some good benchmarks for T scale scenery.
I also used the principles of the Z-trees technique used by Loren from US: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rf_bejdO8g

Using very thin wire I developed some 1:700 trees. I hope they look realistic:

Larch:
http://postimg.org/image/mjr93pixp/
http://postimg.org/image/8fgts2fcv/
http://postimg.org/image/g55f0ehnv/
zdrada69
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun May 07, 2017 10:38 pm


Return to T Gauge Modelling Tips, Tricks & Tutorials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest