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The three Ts. Lift the lid on the secrets of how you do things so others can have a go.....

Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby Reith01 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:11 pm

dkightley wrote:
........ I can’t seem to find square tube section down to a couple of millimetres.....


Here's some in brass....produced by Albion Alloys.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/albion-alloys-square-brass-tube-metric-range-in-305mm-lengths-precision-metals/131274124283?hash=item1e908c2bfb


Thank you, Doug. It would really need steel to get a consistent sharp edge (and I suspect a fair bit of work getting it even). To give an example I'm working on a model that has 10 windows 1mm x 3mm. If I were going to do a number of those I'd have a die made up. It's only for a few high street buildings.

I'm working in Bristol board, thin enough to make this possible (hopefully not too scruffy) but not so thin it buckles when painted.

The high street shops I bought from Shapeways really are too small. I don't want to run into Health and Safety troubles with these tiny t-gauge people banging their heads on the door frames.
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby hank55 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:37 pm

I also think that brass is not hard enough.

Try to find a specialised workshop making die-cutting tools for boxmakers. Better a smaller one, best of all an old independent craftsman making the tools by hand for small boxmakers in his region. They use grades of steel able to stand high forces and pressures acting on the cutting rules in flat die-cutting/creasing presses. (Ask a boxmaker what is the Bobst machine, he should know.) For your better imagination: The cutting rules used for making die-cutting tools must 10 000 times per hour stand pressures up to 150 N/cm2. (Sorry to use metric units, I am not that much skilled in the imperial measuring system... :mrgreen: ) The rules must be replaced after 300 000 to 500 000 cuts. The rules are here in Czechia usually made from steel strips 24 mm wide and 0.7 mm thick, sometimes thicker - up to 1.4 mm. When I needed to cut very small openings I asked a workshop to make from scraps various sizes of round and square tubes equipped on one end with extensions for hammering.

I hope this helps you at least a bit.

Edit: If you have to make more walls with the same windows' numbers and positions you can ask the workshop to make a suitable multi-tool. They will fasten more tubes in a plywood plate and you can hammer out all the windows at one fling. ;)
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby dkightley » Tue Nov 10, 2015 3:08 pm

There is of course this way to get window infills...... http://www.talkingtgauge.net/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=150

The same method would also work for cutting walls with windows in them.
Doug Kightley
Webmaster here and volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby Reith01 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 3:09 pm

hank55 wrote:Thx for yr replies, I am glad that a couple of tricks I had to learn in the first half of my life spent in the East European short-supply conditions :mrgreen: may be still useful even in the 21st century...

In the meantime one more useful papercrafter's trick came to my mind. You may cut out even quite complicated shapes from paper of a thin grade and then impregnate them using a solution of polystyrene (not the foam!!! - very good are scraps of the stuff from various Airfix aicraft and military model kits) in toluene. Yea, and what more - you may use the same sort of solution to glue the impregnated parts together. The impregnating solution should be quite thick while the glue much thinner or you may try even pure toluene for gluing. Everything depends on how paper absorbs the solution - you should carry out more trials to find a correct concentration. Warning: Please do not forget to ventilate your workplace very intensively. Toluene vapours are not only easily flammable but also well-known dope :twisted:


I'll give the polystyrene trick a go! Why not? :)
I'm using Bristol Board at the mo and sometimes thicker "archival" board. The Bristol board has the advantage of giving recessed window openings but this may be less important on buildings behind those on the front. Eventually they'll be merged with ready made 3D prints from the t-gauge shop.

A combination of paper and board would be useful.

Oh boy, this is some scale to work in. Gone are those easy lazy days with 1:87.

....
Edit. Just to say my son who loves a bit of metalwork talked about a die but with the number of cuts still to make, decided against. Probably another 3 buildings, one of which needs different treatment - a kind of Mies van der Rohe thing that is all window! But I'm no architect, most of my efforts are "adapted" (i.e. plagiarised) from other models!

Relevant to this thread is I'm probably going over to UHU from Roket Card Glue. UHU takes longer to set but doesn't risk making quite the same t-gauge mess!
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby Reith01 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:09 pm

dkightley wrote:There is of course this way to get window infills...... http://www.talkingtgauge.net/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=150

The same method would also work for cutting walls with windows in them.


Crikey. Very nice but disheartening. They make what I've done so far look a right mess. I drew the windows on ink-jet transparency over the window shapes on the card but getting them lined up decently without making a mess gluing them in has been a right problem. It was hard enough to get the lines thin enough and even:. Worse to light them up. I had toyed with etching but estimated the time for working the technique up to scratch would be too long.

I might as well start again.
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby hank55 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 7:24 pm

Reith01 wrote:I'm using Bristol Board at the mo and sometimes thicker "archival" board. The Bristol board has the advantage of giving recessed window openings but this may be less important on buildings behind those on the front. Eventually they'll be merged with ready made 3D prints from the t-gauge shop.

A combination of paper and board would be useful.


Exactly. Bristol is great for this purpose. I think some 180 gsm (180 grams per square meter) should be OK in this gauge, for smaller parts maybe even thinner.
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Re: Idiots Guide no1 Tools and work areas

Postby Reith01 » Wed Nov 25, 2015 11:41 pm

hank55 wrote:Thx for yr replies, I am glad that a couple of tricks I had to learn in the first half of my life spent in the East European short-supply conditions :mrgreen: may be still useful even in the 21st century...

In the meantime one more useful papercrafter's trick came to my mind. You may cut out even quite complicated shapes from paper of a thin grade and then impregnate them using a solution of polystyrene (not the foam!!! - very good are scraps of the stuff from various Airfix aicraft and military model kits) in toluene. Yea, and what more - you may use the same sort of solution to glue the impregnated parts together. The impregnating solution should be quite thick while the glue much thinner or you may try even pure toluene for gluing. Everything depends on how paper absorbs the solution - you should carry out more trials to find a correct concentration. Warning: Please do not forget to ventilate your workplace very intensively. Toluene vapours are not only easily flammable but also well-known dope :twisted:


The paper-doping trick has come into its own. I had in mind to model a wide building that's mostly glass. Problem is that the glass has to be almost flush with the main framing and therefore has to be pretty thin. I tried 0.25mm polystyrene but without a fairly thick back undercoat on the inside for opacity it's too transparent. So I turned to paper which takes a coat of black India ink with a white coat over it for internal reflection.

India ink is excellent for adding almost no thickness to the paper while really being opaque.

So I owe you a beer!

Cheers,
Ivor
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